Is it time to start arming medics?

Concealed carry training implications after two paramedics are shot on duty and one returns fire


On December 17, 2020, two Arkansas paramedics were shot on duty. Officials say one of the paramedics returned fire, killing the gunman who shot them after an argument. Arming the EMS and fire workforce has been a hot topic of debate. Please weigh in by answering the poll question: Should EMS and fire personnel be allowed to carry firearms on duty? If you would like your comments to be considered for a future EMS1 article, fill out a short form here to share your thoughts.  

“It’s always a serious thing when someone is forced to take a life,” Kelly Grayson commented, on an incident that “is going to have long-lasting implications for our profession.”

In this special episode of Inside EMS, our cohosts, Chris Cebollero and Kelly Grayson discuss the recent events in Arkansas, and how they are changing the playing field for EMS.

On Dec. 17, 2020, two Arkansas paramedics were shot on duty, while treating a patient in the back of the ambulance. Officials say one of the paramedics returned fire, killing the gunman who shot them after an argument.

Our co-hosts discuss the adoption of body armor in EMS, concealed carry considerations for paramedics, and whether it is time for EMS leadership teams to start having the conversation: Is it time to arm EMS professionals?

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