Catalytic converter thefts nearly push Ohio transport service out of business

13 catalytic converters have been stolen from Nurses Heart Paramedics, which can't afford to repair its ambulances


By Leila Merrill

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Catalytic converter thefts have put a non-emergency transport service nearly out of business, 10TV reported.

Since August, 13 catalytic converters have been stolen from Nurses Heart Paramedics’ ambulances in multiple incidents at its Columbus parking lot. The company does not have a garage.  

A file photo shows catalytic converters that were seized in an investigation. Thefts of the emission control devices have risen as prices for the precious metals they contain have jumped.
A file photo shows catalytic converters that were seized in an investigation. Thefts of the emission control devices have risen as prices for the precious metals they contain have jumped. (Utah Attorney General's Office via AP)

"The thieves came up with one of those rolling backboards like they use in a shop and a blow torch and they literally scooted from one ambulance to the other and they cut five catalytic converters and they were out in 11 minutes," said Brian Hathaway, Operations Manager for Nurses Heart Paramedics.

Hathaway said that the cost of replacing all of the stolen parts would add up to more than $60,000, which the company does not have.

"Our insurance paid for the first instance of theft. The second and third time came straight out of our pocket," he said.

"Our entire staff right now is myself and the owner. Everyone else has been let go," Hathaway said.

Via a mutual aid agreement, another company has been transporting nursing home patients and other clients.

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