Nev. FD to honor FF-paramedic who died by suicide

Firefighter-Paramedic Robbie Pettingill battled PTSD from job-related stress


By News Staff

HENDERSON, Nev. — Officials with the Henderson Fire Department (HFD) announced the death of Firefighter-Paramedic Robbie Pettingill, who died by suicide on Sept. 17. He had been battling PTSD from job-related stress, 3 News Las Vegas reported.

The Henderson Fire Department is planning to honor Pettingill in a line-of-duty death memorial ceremony on Oct. 4.

The Henderson Fire Department is planning to honor Pettingill in a line-of-duty death memorial ceremony on Oct. 4. (Photo/Henderson Fire Department)
The Henderson Fire Department is planning to honor Pettingill in a line-of-duty death memorial ceremony on Oct. 4. (Photo/Henderson Fire Department)

Pettingill was a member of the HFD for 13 years and followed his father's footsteps to become a firefighter himself. 

"Robbie was an exceptional firefighter who loved the job and was well-liked by his colleagues throughout the department," Fire Chief Shawn White said. "Firefighters face unique challenges from repeated exposure to traumatic and stressful events and often respond to situations where they can feel helpless, making them more vulnerable to suicidal thoughts. Our hearts go out to the Pettingill family and we urge anyone who is contemplating taking their own life to reach out to family, friends or community resources for help."

 

It is with profound sadness that the Henderson Fire Department announces the death of Henderson Firefighter/Paramedic...

Posted by Henderson Fire Department on Monday, September 30, 2019

As part of the Oct. 4 memorial ceremony, Henderson fire and police personnel will escort Pettingill's remains from the Henderson Fire Training Center to the Central Christian Church, where a celebration of life service will be held. Family members and representatives from fire departments around the area and EMS providers will be part of the procession.

City officials said that Pettingill's death is a tragic reminder of the chronic stress first responders face every day.

Need help? In the United States call 1 (800) 273-8255 or visit the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

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