EMS leaders studying suicide and mental health in emergency responders

EMS providers are needed to respond to survey about stress, emotional unrest, and lack of resources


WINNEMUCCA, Nev. — EMS leaders are researching EMS providers struggles’ with extreme stress, emotional unrest, low pay, and lack of resources that is leading to a disturbing rise in provider suicide and mental health issues as part of their Ambulance Services Manager (ASM) program.

To participate in the survey and learn more visit EMS Provider Stress survey.   

Paramedic Monique Rose, Humboldt General Hospital EMS, is a member of the ASM cohort working on the effort to identify mental health issues and find a solution.

Capt. Monique Rose and Chief Pat Songer, Humboldt General Hospital EMS, show their support for emergency responder safety." (Image Monique Rose)
Capt. Monique Rose and Chief Pat Songer, Humboldt General Hospital EMS, show their support for emergency responder safety." (Image Monique Rose)

"Preliminary survey results reveal an urgent need to address the mental health needs of our providers," said Rose.

EMS providers face violent situations, traumatic incidents, social isolation from family and friends, long work hours, high call volume and constant pressure from employers to perform. Rose is part of a diverse group of EMS leaders that is seeking answers to difficult questions about the issues impacting field personnel.

"We believe that through our research we will gain a solid starting point for a much larger mission to save our healers," said Rose.

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