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CDC links kratom to 2 cases of salmonella infection

Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration classified kratom as a dangerous opioid, prompting backlash from scientists who claim it can relieve pain


By Binghui Huang
The Morning Call

WASHINGTON — Two cases of salmonella infections in Pennsylvania have been linked to kratom, a plant from southeast Asia, according to a Tuesday report released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The agency reported 28 people have been infected with salmonella in 20 states, and 11 of them have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Two cases of salmonella infections in Pennsylvania have been linked to kratom, a plant from southeast Asia. (Photo/AP)
Two cases of salmonella infections in Pennsylvania have been linked to kratom, a plant from southeast Asia. (Photo/AP)

Kratom is an unregulated supplement that people use as an opioid substitute and a stimulant. Earlier this month, the Food and Drug Administration classified kratom as a dangerous opioid, prompting backlash from some scientists studying its medicinal uses and proponent of Kratom who claim the plant can relieve pain, combat fatigue and improve mood. Federal regulators unsuccessfully tried banning the plant in 2016.

Eight of 11 people interviewed reported consuming kratom in pills, powder, or tea forms.

The CDC recommends that people refrain from consuming kratom at this time.

Copyright 2018 The Morning Call

McClatchy-Tribune News Service
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