NHTSA Office of EMS and ACEP partner to teach Stop the Bleed and CPR

In recognition of National EMS Week and National Stop the Bleed Day, staff from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American College of Emergency Physicians provide critical bystander training to federal workers


By EMS1 Staff

WASHINGTON —  Members of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Office of EMS spend much of their time coordinating and leading efforts to improve EMS systems across the nation. But Thursday was different. In addition to their usual work of overseeing the National EMS Information System and National 911 Program, shepherding projects like EMS Agenda 2050 and the revision of National EMS Education Standards, serving as a resource on EMS issues for their Federal partners they found themselves teaching their colleagues life-saving skills.

In honor of EMS Week and National Stop the Bleed Day, the NHTSA Office of EMS partnered with the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and crews from American Medical Response to demonstrate hands-only CPR and bleeding control in the atrium of the US Department of Transportation (DOT) headquarters in Washington, DC.

In addition to their usual work of overseeing the National EMS Information System and National 911 Program, shepherding projects like EMS Agenda 2050 and the revision of National EMS Education Standards, serving as a resource on EMS issues for their Federal partners they found themselves teaching their colleagues life-saving skills. (Photo/NHTSA)
In addition to their usual work of overseeing the National EMS Information System and National 911 Program, shepherding projects like EMS Agenda 2050 and the revision of National EMS Education Standards, serving as a resource on EMS issues for their Federal partners they found themselves teaching their colleagues life-saving skills. (Photo/NHTSA)

“Our number one priority is supporting local EMS systems in their efforts to prevent and treat injuries and illness,” Jon Krohmer, MD, director of the NHTSA Office of EMS, said. “At the Federal level, that usually means through projects that have a national scope. But sometimes it also means making sure our colleagues here at DOT are ready to respond and provide the bystander care that improves EMS’s chance of saving lives.”

Thursday marked the first time that National Stop the Bleed Day coincided with EMS Week. This year’s EMS Week theme, “Beyond the Call,” highlights efforts of EMS practitioners that go beyond responding to emergencies. For NHTSA and ACEP, this presented an opportunity to demonstrate one of the ways EMS frequently goes beyond the call: by educating and training community members how to respond to emergencies.

Research indicates that uncontrolled bleeding may account for as much as 40% of all trauma-related deaths worldwide. In fact, hemorrhaging ranks as the most common cause of preventable trauma-related death. The Stop the Bleed initiative was created to provide people with the training and equipment necessary to prevent trauma victims from “bleeding out” before EMS arrives on the scene.

“Taking the time to learn a few simple first aid and safety techniques might just save the life of a friend or loved one,” Vidor Friedman, MD, FACEP, president of ACEP, said. “Performing CPR or taking steps to control severe bleeding are just two ways that bystanders can offer support until trained medical professionals arrive. ACEP is proud to work with partners in emergency medicine and communities nationwide to empower bystanders with critical skills in the moments after a disaster or emergency.”

“EMS Week is not just about honoring the dedication of our nation’s EMS practitioners. It’s also a time to recognize that the EMS system starts with prevention, recognition and bystander response,” Krohmer said.

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