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Home > Topics > Fatal Incidents
June 24, 2014

2 Ky. medics injured in head-on ambulance collision

The medics suffered serious injuries; the driver of the car that hit the ambulance was pronounced dead at the scene

Wave3News.com

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — One person was killed and two Louisville Metro EMS workers were seriously injured in a crash involving an ambulance.

The crash became the worst case scenario for emergency crews who were trying to get to one life or death situation only to become a part of another one. "When someone else in the other vehicle is hurt or killed," said EMS Chief of Staff Kristen Miller, "That's a heavy mantle to carry."

According to Louisville Metro police, at 6:27 p.m. Monday the ambulance was traveling with lights and sirens eastbound on River Road, on a medical run of a report of a man down, when the ambulance crashed into a blue Geo Metro turning right onto River Road from Frankfort Avenue.

wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather

Full story: 1 dead, 2 EMS workers injured in crash involving ambulance

Comments
The comments below are member-generated and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of EMS1.com or its staff. If you cannot see comments, try disabling privacy and ad blocking plugins in your browser. All comments must comply with our Member Commenting Policy.
Jason Bolton Jason Bolton Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:13:33 AM We need to re-evaluate the need for code 3 responses industry wide.
Theresa Faulkner Pyle Theresa Faulkner Pyle Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:22:44 AM Put your family into a rural area, pretend you are the one responding.... wouldn't you want to go Code 3?
Andre Ruby Andre Ruby Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:31:53 AM I have functioned in the rural setting most of my career and it truly is not the code in which we run but the awareness of proper driving tactics. I have be in the position of educating the providers as well and they truly drove to the best of there ability: accidents happen but when due regard is in place they are diminished. Code 3 should not be abused but be utilized for proper traffic maneuvering
Terry Kinslow Johns Terry Kinslow Johns Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:36:31 AM Sirens need to be louder for sure, I can barely hear them :(
Robin Daghlian-Curasco Robin Daghlian-Curasco Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:38:19 AM Geez...brothers and sisters. ..stop with the attitude and opinions. ..how about some prayers. .and im not a holy roller!
Julie Etheridge Corley Julie Etheridge Corley Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:43:20 AM I personally know one of the Medics and worked EMS in Louisville for several years. He has been properly trained in driving Code 3. The area where this happened is a bad area and like other big cities people are always in a hurry or think they can beat the ambulance. I am not saying this happened but I know how bad it can be in Louisville. Prayers to my EMS brothers and the family of the man killed.
Tammy Jones Tammy Jones Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:46:29 AM Prayers for speedy recovery
Teresa Johnson Teresa Johnson Tuesday, June 24, 2014 11:51:53 AM My most fervent prayers to all involved....
Greg Nugent Greg Nugent Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:05:22 PM It was not a head on crash, the car turned in front of the ambulance and was T-boned on the drivers side. Prayers for all involved
Iquana Jackson Iquana Jackson Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:20:29 PM Praying for the victims and their families.
Terry Johnson Terry Johnson Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:31:31 PM Just make a recording of the average 8 to 10 year old girl screaming at the top of her lungs and replace the siren with the recording. I guarantee it will get attention.
Charlie Mondaro Charlie Mondaro Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:55:17 PM All the Monday morning quarterbacking is kinda funny. Sure we should do this or that after the fact. Some people when they call in downplay the emergency some exaggerate. You going to decide on what the dispatch call is, I say no. Respond to ALL calls code 3 unless it is a pre arranged transport. That doesn't mean a 1000 miles an hour drving on the wrong side of the road and the sidewalk, it is just what I said code 3 light and siren in a normal code 3 mode. 99% of the people reading this will know what I mean, some (newer people) will say how about this and that. I think most people call the ambulance for a reason, you might NOT agree with the reason they called but you determine whats what when you get there. That's the whole idea of what we do. Stay safe everyone . . . . . .
Terry Kinslow Johns Terry Kinslow Johns Tuesday, June 24, 2014 1:07:16 PM I'm serious, usually I see the red rights from a distance but don't hear the siren till they are at the intersection.. some car radio's are blasting louder :( ugh
Nancy C Reeves Rush Nancy C Reeves Rush Tuesday, June 24, 2014 1:22:27 PM My thoughts and prayers to the crew and to the families of everyone involved!
Kitwench Ferret Kitwench Ferret Tuesday, June 24, 2014 2:03:39 PM Stopping at a stop sign and then entering traffic is NOT the same as 'can't hear that ambulance right behind me '. This was not 'my car is so sealed I can't hear ' This was 'Didn't bother to look to see if the road was clear' before entering traffic after a mandatory stop. IF he stopped.
Chris Seyffert Chris Seyffert Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:17:31 PM They did a study on All Code 3 vs none in Baltimore or Boston about 20 years ago and the stats were convincing - better to drive routine to all, way too many accidents when all code 3 - I just wish there was a way to review accidents that happen everywhere so that we can learn from others mistakes or, more importantly see and learn that, despite great driving, accidents happen any way - at least we would see how little lt takes to become a statistic - How many times in your career did the time you saved by driving fast actually impact pt outcome?
Charlie Mondaro Charlie Mondaro Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:27:15 PM Chris have at it bro . . . that's like trying to figure out what days to have more manpower when the highest call volume is, to save money on crews . . . . I would not want to be the unk medical when you decide it wasn't important enough to get to a 911 call quicker. "Maybe" it's just me I doubt it.
James Vogt James Vogt Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:46:35 PM Charlie Mondaro As a first responder, code 3 makes little to no difference. In the vast majority of 911 calls, how many get a code 3 transport from the scene. I worked in an county, that for a long period of time, travelled approx. 20 miles to the nearest hospitals. Code 3 saved maybe 5 minutes of travel time. Of the vast majority of calls that I was involved in, probably close to 90% did not warrant a code 3 transport, which would also mean that the response did not need to be code 3. Think about the lives at risk during those times. That crew was responding to a man down, a vague complaint at best. Many of those come from passers by on cell phones. They don't stop and check on the person, they just call and keep driving. From experience, you arrive and find no one or someone resting due to heat or something else. That particular sccident, the call was canceled 1 min after the accident. Think about it!
Wendydoug Bolon Wendydoug Bolon Tuesday, June 24, 2014 4:04:06 PM Prayers for all involved. God's grace upon you all
Charlie Mondaro Charlie Mondaro Tuesday, June 24, 2014 4:24:42 PM James I have been doing EMS for 30 years so tell me about "first responders", you guys play roulette with your pts, we will save ours. You can what if and how about all you want. Nothing to think about done is done.
Melissa Fuentes Melissa Fuentes Tuesday, June 24, 2014 4:51:06 PM Theresa Faulkner Pyle - No. Not the way I see too many people drive code. Just because my loved one is dying doesn't mean I want others to die also. "Going code" only makes people feel better.
James Vogt James Vogt Tuesday, June 24, 2014 5:04:41 PM Charlie Mondaro I have almost 20 yrs emergency medicine. All Police, Fire, and EMS are first responders. I have Been an EMT and a firefighter for no less than 10 yrs. I never play roulette with my patients. For you to say that is to stereotype everyone. I have no need to argue with you. I know myself and my skills. You know nothing of me. I have worked in and around the city in which this incident happened. My only point is, there is no point point in going CODE 3 to every call, except scheduled transfers. Ask anyone who has ever been in the situation this crew is now in and see what the responses are from them.
Charlie Mondaro Charlie Mondaro Tuesday, June 24, 2014 5:11:36 PM James you are picking out a situation and trying to right it. If that's the case let everyone take a taxi to the ER and sort them out from there. Only the smallest per cent won't make it but with your logic it don't matter because people would have died NO MATTER who was there at whatever time anyway. Per cents are per cents. Lets agree to disagree and move on. There will be accidents emergency vehicles or not. We can save the world or NOT make things happen unless you stop it 100%. Bottom line. Have a good day. BTW I sleep at night just fine.
Turk Threlkeld Turk Threlkeld Tuesday, June 24, 2014 5:45:07 PM I agree..stop with all the opinions and should have beens. Pray for these medics who were only doin their job. They don't get paid enough to hear all ur bulls.it. I know..I was a medic for 30+ yrs. So my heart and prayers go out to these medics.
Leilani Akona Leilani Akona Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:11:20 PM My prayers go out to all EMS workers who put there lives on line everyday!
Brenda Sills Brenda Sills Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:13:46 PM You are so wrong Melissa...I work ems and I promise you we do not go Code just to feel better. Go Code so people try to race down the road to beat the ambulance or so cars can slam on brakes in front of you because they just got off the cell phone and realized there was an ambulance behind them, as every one knows you pull to the right NOT the left to yield for emergency vehicles, so if you feel emts and paramedic go code just to get their kicks on you could not be further from the truth
Brenda Sills Brenda Sills Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:14:41 PM I am prayer for the emts involved and the family of the person that did not make it
Jason Bolton Jason Bolton Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:24:37 PM Theresa Faulkner Pyle Studies have shown that response time differences between code 3 and code 2 are minimal. Wake effect accidents and direct involvement accidents make code 3 responses reckless at best. Melissa Fuentes nailed it on the head, responding lights and sirens is all about making people think we are coming as fast as possible.
Debra Laurie Pitcher-Dunbar Debra Laurie Pitcher-Dunbar Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:40:05 PM Thoughts and prayers to the crew
Chris Burge Chris Burge Tuesday, June 24, 2014 9:05:08 PM You LazyBoy quarterbacks need to shut your mouths and say a SILENT prayer for all those involved. Now a simple statement of reality. Failure to yield to an emergency vehicle! I would rather run to a non emergent patient that saunter to an emergency. Time is our worst enemy. Stupid, self absorbed, distracted non yielding drivers are our second worst. I have been in this business for over 35 years. Based on the average human response to illness, injury and no emergency medical training coupled with lackadaisical and inept 911 call takers, it is impossible to accurately "diagnose" or triage most calls for help. You respond to the emergency request code three (lights AND siren) and deal with what you find when you get there. The only realistic way to deal with the risk is proper and regular Emergency Vehicle Driving Training. It is all part of the job. Grow up and deal with it!
Sandie DeMarr Hargrave Sandie DeMarr Hargrave Wednesday, June 25, 2014 10:06:54 AM RIP and may there be a speedy and full recovery for the EMS workers involved. Unless you do it, don't second guess it!
David Robert Dillon David Robert Dillon Wednesday, June 25, 2014 1:58:17 PM Chris Seyffert Louisville EMS does not run code to all runs, but a man down would be considered a Code 3 ALS run, if BLS truck closer, they would have been dispatched as well, and if no need for ALS, then would have cancelled them upon arrival and assessment.
Stacy Lynn Hylander-Copelan Stacy Lynn Hylander-Copelan Wednesday, June 25, 2014 10:46:15 PM I am praying for them...
Stacy Lynn Hylander-Copelan Stacy Lynn Hylander-Copelan Wednesday, June 25, 2014 10:55:22 PM I agree, in the area I work we go lights and siren to calls just like all areas I suppose. I know that if an ambulance were coming to my mom's for her for whatever the reason, and the ambulance was across town fighting traffic I would hope that the crew got to my mom as quickly as possible. I speak from experience.... no matter the training, the speed you are driving, accidents happen everywhere everyday... everyone just try and stay safe!
Kelly Dwiggins Kelly Dwiggins Thursday, June 26, 2014 12:33:21 AM yeah well you do live in California so we'll just let that one slide.
Kelly Dwiggins Kelly Dwiggins Thursday, June 26, 2014 12:42:00 AM james Vogt when your lying on that backboard bleeding out, I want you to remember to tell the driver to be sure to obey the speed limit because 5 minutes doesn't matter!!
James Vogt James Vogt Thursday, June 26, 2014 6:46:24 AM Kelly Dwiggins Make sure you read the entire content of my comments. Apparently you didn't or msinterpreted them. The majority of calls end up being non-emergency. I have gone code 3 to many calls and arrived to find that the patient was refusing treatment and transport. Many of those, because a neighbor or passer by called and never bother to ask if help was actually needed.
Patricia Mullis Patricia Mullis Thursday, June 26, 2014 7:32:23 AM My prayers are with them!
Jj Moore Jj Moore Thursday, June 26, 2014 12:37:45 PM so sorry to hear this what ppl don't know is that been in the ems is a hard job my prayers are with you all
Kelly Dwiggins Kelly Dwiggins Thursday, June 26, 2014 7:53:26 PM I understand that, its happened to us all, but unfortunately in this business you can't make response decisions based on passed experiences. The chances that we have to actually save a life are few and far between. This is not the job to become complacent. I do get what your saying, I just don't agree with it.

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