Make this page my home page
  1. Drag the home icon in this panel and drop it onto the "house icon" in the tool bar for the browser

  2. Select "Yes" from the popup window and you're done!

Home > EMS Products > Training Tools
February 20, 2013

Top 6 real-life simulation stories

EMS1's Facebook fans talk of their memories in the classroom

By EMS1 Staff

For the latest in our Product Supplement Series, we asked our Facebook fans to share their memories of life in the classroom...

Mock car crash in the ambulance bay. The patient was on a back board strapped in, yelling and screaming. I put my hand over her mouth and say, "No need to thank me, I'm just doing muh jab." Everyone started laughing and I ruined the simulation! – Jake Bauter

In CPR training, the instructor told this woman in class if she did the chest compressions any harder she was going to prolapse the dummy rectum – Curt Curtner

Staying alive staying alive, oh oh oh oh staying alive… – Anthony Graves

Best training memory: While in EMT training, our county (under 10,000 residents) decided to have a drill. We set up a country drill of a hay ride full of kids being hit by a truck. Fifteen patients in all for this drill. Many years later on a major highway not over a mile away, we had an actual event where a truck rear ended a hay ride full of kids. The trailer hitch was broke loose from the truck pulling the trailer. I was first medic in and used lessons from the training to make this incident run much smoother. Many responders remembered the training exercise and prevented many of the mistakes which occurred the first time. Things went very smoothly. The moral of this story, be careful what you practice, sometimes it happens. – Patrick Gomer Roberson

In EMT class we had a discussion on using the limited materials we get in our trauma packs to treat the pt. The instructor, a paramedic, talked of using a belt for a tourniquet, soda bottles for headblocks and various splinting materials that can be used.  I ran a trauma call on Labor Day in which a young teen had been involved in a UTV (Polaris Razor) rollover on a sandbar on the river. A good half-mile up from the entry point on the river we found him. He was lying prone in the sand, with a T-shirt wrapped around his right arm by the armpit. He suffered a compound fx of the humerus, and tore his brachial artery. The T-shirt was not preventing a large amount of blood loss by any means. I grabbed my BP Cuff and placed it above the fx as a tourniquet, pumping it up into the low 200s. Then, when we got him placed on the board, we didn't have a set of headblocks to secure CSpiine. We used his tennis shoes and secured them with tape and ace bandages. The kid is alive and still has the use of his arm thanks to thinking outside the box. – Jen Wolsleben

When I was in high school, we were doing SAR training operations for a downed FF. After locating him, I put my buddy straps on and at the same time my low air bell was going off. Although it was simulated, I started hauling him as quick as I could and all the preceptors started cheering me on for the new found strength I had (we had been pulling each other out of the building for hours). I left my rescued buddy with rug burn like scrapes but he said he’d rather have that then be dead in real life situation. – Kate Landreth

Comments
The comments below are member-generated and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of EMS1.com or its staff. If you cannot see comments, try disabling privacy and ad blocking plugins in your browser. All comments must comply with our Member Commenting Policy.