Make this page my home page
  1. Drag the home icon in this panel and drop it onto the "house icon" in the tool bar for the browser

  2. Select "Yes" from the popup window and you're done!

EMS Education Tips

EMS Education Sponsors

Featured Distributors

Featured Product

Featured Product Categories

EMS Education Tips



Everyday EMS
by Greg Friese

Refining OPQRST as an Assessment Tool

By Greg Friese

Category: Clinical Practice

OPQRST is a useful mnemonic (memory device) for learning about your patient’s pain complaint. It is a conversation starter between you, the investigator, and the patient, your research subject. Here are some suggestions on how to approach using OPQRST as an assessment tool:

  • Onset: “Did your pain start suddenly or gradually get worse and worse?” This is also a chance to ask, “What were you doing when the pain started?”
  • Provokes or Palliates: Instead of asking, “What provokes your pain?” use real, casual words. Try, “What makes your pain better or worse?”
  • Quality: Asking, “Is your pain sharp or dull?” limits your patient to two choices, when their pain might not be either. Instead ask, “What words would you use to describe your pain?” or “What does your pain feel like?”
  • Radiates: This is another chance to use real, conversational words during assessment. Asking, “Does your pain radiate?” sounds silly and pompous to the patient. Instead use this question, “Point to where it hurts the most. Where does your pain go from there?”
  • Severity: Remember, pain is subjective and relative to each individual patient you treat. Have an open mind for any response from 0 to 10.
  • Time: This is a reference to when the pain started or how long ago it started.

Use OPQRST wisely to get plentiful and useful clues. What are your successful OPQRST tricks? Share them in the comments section.


About the author

Greg Friese is the Director of Education for CentreLearn Solutions, LLC. He is also an e-learning designer, writer, podcaster, presenter, paramedic, and marathon runner. Read more from him at the EverydayEMSTips.com blog. Ask questions or submit tip ideas to Greg by e-mailing him at greg.friese@ems1.com.
Comments
The comments below are member-generated and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of EMS1.com or its staff. If you cannot see comments, try disabling privacy and ad blocking plugins in your browser. All comments must comply with our Member Commenting Policy.